Early Career Award Recipients

///Early Career Award Recipients
Early Career Award Recipients2019-05-02T20:47:12+00:00

INS Early Career Research Award Recipients

The INS recognizes achievement for early career contributions in research, education or service in the field of neuropsychology.


Daniel Mograbi
Daniel Mograbi
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 2019 Mid-Year Meeting
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – July 10-12, 2019

Ekaterina Dobryaova
Ekaterina Dobryaova
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 47th Annual Meeting
New York City, New York, USA – February 20-23, 2019

Fatigue is another dopamine-dependent construct that has been shown to rely on the fronto-striatal brain regions and is a symptom that individuals with MS and TBI often experience. Given this neural common denominator between fatigue and outcome processing, I investigated whether fatigue can be reduced through engaging individuals with MS and TBI in a goal-directed behavior, showing that fatigue can be reduced through outcome presentation.

Ondrei Bezdicek
Ondrei Bezdicek
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 2018 Mid-Year Meeting
Prague, Czech Republic – July 18-20, 2018

Our study challenged the retrieval deficit and the associative deficit hypotheses of memory impairments in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The former supports a memory deficit mediated by attention/executive dysfunctions, while the latter hypothesizes a genuine memory impairment in PD.

Marie-Jose van Tol
Marie-Jose van Tol
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 46th Annual Meeting
Washington, D.C, USA – February 14-17, 2018

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder, affecting between 10 and 20 % of the world population at some point in their lives. MDD is characterized by a high risk for relapse after recovery (40% within 2 years). Therefore, understanding and changing the highly recurrent course of MDD is of high clinical and societal importance.

R. Shayna Rosenbaum
R. Shayna Rosenbaum
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 45th Annual Meeting
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA – February 1-4, 2017

Much of what we know about brain-behavior relations is made possible by the study of neuropsychological cases. Given the ubiquity of functional neuroimaging studies, and the importance they have assumed in elucidating brain function, the goal of my talk is to describe how single cases continue to challenge accepted dogma, to lead to new discoveries, and to suggest hypotheses and theories that steer the field in new directions.

Aikaterini (Katerina) Fotopoulou
Aikaterini (Katerina) Fotopoulou
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 2016 Mid-Year Meeting
London, England, UK – July 6-8, 2016

Katerina studied cognitive neuropsychology and theoretical psychoanalysis at University College London (UCL) before completing her PhD on the neuropsychology of confabulation at the University of Durham, UK. She is currently an Associate Professor (Reader) at the Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology at UCL.

Ben Hampstead
Ben Hampstead
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 44th Annual Meeting
Boston, Massachusetts, USA – February 3-6, 2016

Memory deficits characterize Alzheimer’s disease and its clinical precursor amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). While a growing body of research furthers our understanding of the detection, characterization, and neuroanatomy of these memory deficits, the clinical translation of these findings has lagged. So, providers continue to be faced with the critical question of “What can I do about it?” Treatment is typically limited to a handful of medications that are, at best, marginally successful. This limitation has fostered a growing interest in non-pharmacologic treatment methods for minimizing learning and memory deficits, approaches that include cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation.

Miriam Beauchamp
Miriam Beauchamp
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 43rd Annual Meeting
Denver, Colorado, USA – February 4-7, 2015

Through a journey from toddlerhood to adolescence, this talk will provide a multimodal perspective of the impact of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) on social functioning. The emergence of socially meaningful interactions, better perspective taking, greater social independence and more complex societal roles and responsibilities are key milestones of social development. Brain disruptions occurring at any stage along this path can disturb the delicate balance of environmental, cerebral, and cognitive processes underlying social competence, leading to inappropriate social behaviors.

Angela Jefferson
Angela Jefferson
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 42nd Annual Meeting
Seattle, Washington, USA – February 12-15, 2014

As the population ages, unhealthy cognitive decline and dementia are increasingly important public health issues. Vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis, are associated with abnormal neuroanatomic changes, cognitive impairment, and clinical dementia in older adults. A poorly understood aspect of compromised vascular health and cognitive aging is the association between systemic hemodynamics (cardiac output or the amount of blood exiting the heart to perfuse the system) and brain aging.

Adam Brickman
Adam Brickman
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 40th Annual Meeting
Montreal, Quebec, Canada – February 15-18, 2012

Dr. Brickman uses advanced neuroimaging techniques to understand cognitive aging and dementia. He is particularly interested in white matter abnormalities and the intersection between vascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Ongoing Research: The effect of age on neuromorphology and its cognitive consequences. His current research efforts focus primarily on “normal” cognitive and structural changes across the adult lifespan.

John Gunstad
John Gunstad
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 39th Annual Meeting
Boston, Massachusetts, USA – February 2-5, 2011

John Gunstad is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Kent State University. He obtained a B.A. in psychology from Moorhead State University and both his M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology with concentration in clinical neuropsychology from Ohio University. He completed internship and F32 postdoctoral fellowship at Brown Medical School, where he began a line of research in the neurocognitive effects of medical conditions including obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Anna Barrett
Anna Barrett
Early Career Research Award Recipient
INS 36th Annual Meeting
Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA – February 6-9, 2008