Course Title: CE Workshop 08 - Cognitive Assessment among Diverse Latinos in SOL-INCA (Study of Latinos-Investigation of Cognition Aging) (Gonzalez/Tarraf)


Credit Hours: 1.5


Instructor(s) Hector M. Gonzalez; Wassim Tarraf


Hector M. González, PhD
Associate Professor
Dept. of Neurosciences & Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
School of Medicine
University of California, San Diego
and
Wassim Tarraf, PhD
Associate Professor
Gerontology and Healthcare Sciences
Wayne State University

CE Workshop # 8:


Cognitive Assessment among Diverse Latinos in SOL-INCA (Study of Latinos-Investigation of Cognition Aging)

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

The Study of Latinos-Investigation of Cognitive Aging (SOL-INCA) is an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Cognitive assessment data of 9,637 diverse middle-aged and older Latinos were collected at 4 HCHS/SOL clinics in Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA between 2008 and 2011 (Visit 1). The same cognitive battery was repeated as part of SOL-INCA between 2015 and 2018 during HCHS/SOL Visit 2. The SOL-INCA is the largest study of cognitive aging among diverse Latinos. We will describe the challenges and decision making that went into mounting SOL-INCA in the diverse Latin American cohort of HCHS/SOL. Moreover, we will discuss the deep cardiometabolic phenotyping and genotyping leveraged from HCHS/SOL that make the SOL-INCA a new and valuable resource for filling major gaps in scientific knowledge of this important, but understudied population.


Upon conclusion of this course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the gaps in normative data pertaining to Latino cognitive assessment
  • List the challenges posed by evaluating diverse language variations of Latin American Spanish-speakers
  • Explain the SOL-INCA sample characteristics and findings related to cognitive aging

Speaker Biography:

Dr. Hector M. González is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosciences and Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He is a licensed clinical neuropsychologist with clinical research training and experiences in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Dr. González was a clinical research fellow and later co-investigator of the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), which is a landmark dementia study among Mexican-origin Latinos. He served as Principle Investigator of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), Neurocognitive Reading Center. Dr. González is PI of the Study of Latinos-Investigation of neurocognitive aging (SOL-INCA), which is the largest study of Latino neurocognitive health and aging to-date examining sociocultural, cardiometabolic and genomic risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and ADRD among diverse middle-aged aged and older Latinos. Dr. González serves on numerous state and national advisory and editorial boards. His research efforts are primarily focused on population-based cardiovascular and neuroepidemiologic studies of midlife markers of brain aging, neurocognitive decline, and ethical/racial inequalities in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias among diverse Latinos.

Dr. Wassim Tarraf is an Associate Professor in Gerontology and Healthcare Sciences at Wayne State University. His research evaluates disparities in health, health behavior, and healthcare access and use among race/ethnic minorities in the United States and investigates the social determinants of health and healthcare. His work relies primarily on analyses of large complex data sets. Dr. Tarraf is an investigator and director of analytics for the SOL-INCA Lab, which is a joint lab (WSU/UCSD) with members located at Wayne State’s Institute of Gerontology and the University of California, San Diego, Department of Neurosciences. He is lead biostatistician on three NIA-funded (R01) ancillary studies focused on cognitive aging and ADRD risk factors among Latinos, and two exploratory (R21) grants funded by NIA and NHLBI to examine sleep as a risk factor for unhealthy aging among Latinos. Dr. Tarraf is also the Analysis Core co-leader for the NIA-funded Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research (MCUAAR) and a faculty affiliate with the Michigan Center for Contextual Factors in Alzheimer's Disease (MCCFAD). These two Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research are primarily focused on training the next generation of researchers in minority health and enhancing the diversity of the aging research community. Dr. Tarraf’s research career has been devoted to the analyses of population health data with a particular focus on minority populations, evaluating disparities in health, cognitive function, health behaviors, and use of healthcare among race/ethnic minorities in the US, and investigating the social determinants of health and healthcare use among minorities.