Course Title: CE Workshop 09 - Practice Effects in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Disease: What We Know, What We Don’t Know, and What We Better Figure Out Really Quick (Duff)


Credit Hours: 1.5


Instructor(s) Kevin Duff


Kevin Duff, PhD ABPP
Professor
Department of Neurology
University of Utah

CE Workshop # 09:


Practice Effects in Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Disease: What We Know, What We Don’t Know, and What We Better Figure Out Really Quick

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

Clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often require that participants are repeatedly cognitively tested across multiple years to track progression of symptoms. However, frequent repeat testing can lead to practice effects, even in patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild AD. These practice effects can have untoward consequences, including misinterpretation of trial results. This presentation will review existing literature on repeat testing and practice effects in trials of AD and MCI. It will also explain the ramifications of ignoring the current knowledge of practice effects, which can lead to inefficient, expensive, and inaccurate trials. Finally, some recommendations will be made for incorporating this information about practice effects into future clinical trials.


Upon conclusion of this course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the current state of our knowledge on practice effects in AD and MCI
  • Explain the negative consequences of ignoring practice effects in these trials
  • Compare methods for incorporating practice effects into future trials

Speaker Biography:

Dr. Kevin Duff is a Professor within the Department of Neurology at the University of Utah and a board certified Clinical Neuropsychologist in the Cognitive Disorders Clinic, a sub-specialty clinic of the University of Utah Center for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research (CACIR). Dr. Duff’s research expertise is within the area of practice effects associated with cognitive assessments, aging and dementia. His funding by the NIH focuses on the role of practice effects in predicting dementia. In tandem, Dr. Duff’s active clinical work focuses on a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders, from Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s disease to Huntington’s disease.