CE Workshop #12: Constraint-Induced Therapies for Neurological Disorders: Contemporary Findings, Application to Disorders of Movement, Aphasia, and Visual Perception, and Increased CNS Neuroplasticity

Victor W. Mark, MD, UAB Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Victor W. Mark, MD,
UAB Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Victor W. Mark, MD Abstract & Learning Objectives: The Constraint-Induced therapies (CI therapies) are a family of treatments for diverse neurological disorders that are disabling because of their associated Learned Nonuse or Misuse: the conditioned inhibition or maladaptation of purposive activity when compensatory but inefficient means are used instead for everyday activities. The resulting disability may be counter-conditioned by a CI therapy program. The CI Therapy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama at Birmingham has conducted clinical trials of the CI therapies for over the past 25 years. In this course we will review: (1) the basic neuroscience foundation for CI therapies, (2) the theoretical model for Learned Nonuse, (3) the fundamental methods of CI therapies, (4) the immediate as well as long-term functional benefits of CI therapy for persons with stroke, cerebral palsy, TBI, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, including results from numerous Randomized Controlled Trials, (5) the validated measurement of learned nonuse in the real world as the preferred outcome measure of CI therapy, (6) the improvements in brain structure on MRI following CI therapies, and (7) the adaptation of CI therapy methods for disorders of leg use, aphasia, and visual perception. We will also review video demonstrations of the treatment methods for children and adults as well. This workshop will be appropriate for clinicians or researchers with intermediate/advanced knowledge of neuroscience, psychology, or rehabilitation. Upon conclusion of this course, learners will be able to: Explain the basic neuroscience foundation for CI therapies Gain an understanding the theoretical model for Learned Nonuse Describe the fundamental methods of CI therapies List the immediate as well as long-term functional benefits of CI therapy for persons with stroke, cerebral palsy, TBI, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury Describe the validated measurement of learned nonuse in the real world as the preferred outcome measure of CI therapy Discuss the improvements in brain structure on MRI following CI therapies Explain the adaptation of CI therapy methods for disorders of leg use, aphasia, and visual perception Speaker Biography: Dr Mark is an American Board-Certified Neurologist who completed a Behavioral Neurology research fellowship at the University of Florida and has been a member of the INS since 1986. He has been a research scientist and consultation physician for the UAB Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation since 1999. Since that time he has also been the Medical Director and a research scientist for the Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Laboratory at UAB. His work has concentrated on two areas: the executive control of visuospatial attention following stroke, and the application of Constraint-Induced therapies to various neurological disorders and deficits. His work in the latter has primarily been directed at care for adults with either stroke or multiple sclerosis, for which he has been the recipient of several grants from the NIH and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Celebrating 50 Years-Binding the Past and Present