CE Workshop #7: Financial and Health Decision Making in Old Age: Neuropsychology, Neuroimaging, and Race Considerations

S. Duke Han, PhD, ABPP-CN, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

S. Duke Han, PhD, ABPP-CN, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

S. Duke Han, PhD, ABPP-CN Abstract & Learning Objectives: Decision making refers to the ability to consider competing alternatives and make an optimal choice. Older adults are regularly faced with consequential decisions regarding financial and health matters, and recent work suggests decision making may decline with age. Age-associated pathological changes in the brain are well documented, suggesting the suboptimal functioning of neural systems may contribute to impaired decision making in old age. While neuroimaging has yielded advances in the knowledge of brain systems involved in younger populations, relatively little is known about the neuroimaging correlates of pathological changes associated with decision making in older adults. This presentation will discuss the neuroimaging correlates of impaired financial and health decision making in old age, as well as the cognitive, affective, and contextual factors that are associated with these patterns. Racial differences in decision making will also be considered in view of the potential mediating and moderating factors that drive them. As a result of participation in this course, the learner will achieve the following objectives: Have a deeper understanding of the critical brain structures that support decision making in old age, Be familiar with cutting-edge translational research techniques for investigating financial and health decision making in old age Speaker Biography: Dr. Duke Han is a diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology in clinical neuropsychology, Director of Neuropsychology in the Department of Family Medicine, and an Associate Professor of Family Medicine, Neurology, Psychology, and Gerontology at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in psychology with a specialization in neuroscience from Duke University, and his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston. He received training in clinical neuropsychology and experimental neuroimaging techniques through various programs of Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He continued his clinical neuropsychology and neuroimaging activities during his internship and postdoctoral fellowship years at UCSD and the San Diego VA Healthcare System. He maintains an active research collaboration with the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, where he was most recently a tenured faculty member. Dr. Han is interested in the study of factors that affect cognition and decision making in aging. He also has special interests in using novel neuroimaging and statistical approaches to better understand these factors. Dr. Han is the recipient of the Paul B. Beeson NIH K23 Career Development Award in aging research (2012-2017), which is supported by the National Institute on Aging, the American Federation of Aging Research (AFAR), the John A. Hartford Foundation, Atlantic Philanthropies and the Starr Foundation. He is actively involved in peer-review of research grants for the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and manuscripts for over 30 scientific journals. He is on the editorial board for the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. He is the only board-certified neuropsychologist on the inaugural Global Council for Brain Health, an independent science collaborative convened and supported by the AARP and AgeUK. He is a member of the oral examiner cadre for the ABPP clinical neuropsychology board certification process. He currently holds leadership or mentorship roles in the International Neuropsychological Society (INS), the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN), and the Society of Clinical Neuropsychology (Division 40) of the American Psychological Association. Celebrating 50 Years-Binding the Past and Present