The INS Presidential Address: The Impact of the Past on Current and Future Views of Limb Apraxia

Kathleen Y. Haaland, University of New Mexico

Kathleen Y. Haaland, University of New Mexico

Kathleen Y. Haaland, PhD, ABPP-CN Abstract & Learning Objectives: This presentation will explore the impact of single cases on past and current conceptualizations of limb apraxia including the work of Hugo Liepmann and several previous INS presidents (Geschwind, Kaplan, Heilman, and Gonzalez Rothi). Videotapes of classic apraxic syndromes will be presented. A major focus will be on how the views of the cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of limb apraxia have changed from the 19th to the 21st century leading to the current emphasis on a left hemisphere cortical network with a left parietal node. Unanswered questions, including the differential roles of left parietal, temporal, and frontal regions in limb praxis, will be discussed in the context of future work that utilizes multi-method approaches that integrate lesion studies with functional imaging and stimulation studies. Upon conclusion of this course, learners will be able to: Delineate one way that Liepmann’s cases influenced his theory of limb apraxia. Discuss one major difference between Geschwind’s view and Heilman and Gonzalez Rothi’s view of the parietal lobe’s role in limb apraxia. Specify one function of the left parietal lobe in limb apraxia. List two methods that have informed current understanding of the neuroanatomical substrates of limb praxis to emphasize a broad left hemisphere network with critical node in the left parietal lobe. Speaker Biography: Kathleen Haaland is a Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Neurology at the University of New Mexico. She is board certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology and the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology. She has published over 100 papers and chapters largely focused on the cognitive and neuroanatomical correlates of action in stroke, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease. Her research has been continuously funded from 1981 to 2014. More recently she has developed an interest in the neuropsychological correlates of PTSD. She has been recognized by the National Academy of Neuropsychology with a Lifetime Career Contribution Award, and she was the previous president of the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and the Society of Clinical Neuropsychology of the American Psychological Association. She was the Editor of the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society from 2004 to 2014, and she is currently the President of the International Neuropsychological Society. Celebrating 50 Years-Binding the Past and Present