46th Annual Meeting

February 14-17, 2018

Continuing Education Workshops

Looking to Add Plenary CE Credit After the Washington DC Meeting? It is definitely still possible to add the CE option for any plenary sessions you attended in full in Washington DC. Simply complete and submit this CE Addition form.

**Please note that in order to add CE for any plenary session, we must have your attendance slip from that session on file. If we did not receive your attendance slip at the session, you will not be able to add the CE option for that session.

Read workshop descriptions and presenter bios for the 46th Annual Meeting program below.

CE Workshop Credit Hours

CE Workshops 1-6: 3 Hours (each)
CE Workshops 7-12: 1.5 Hours (each)
Plenary Sessions A-G: 1 Hour (each)
Program Total: 17.5 CE Hours or 1.75 ASHA CEUs

View Schedule at a Glance

CE Program Accreditation & Disclosures

Please click here to download and review disclosure of relevant financial and non-financial relationships.

APA Approved Sponsor

INS is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. INS maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Up to 17.5 credit hours are available for this program. All CE sessions are geared for advanced level instructional activity.

ASHA Continuing Education Approved Provider

This course is offered for up to 1.75 ASHA CEUs (Advanced Level, Professional area).

Wednesday, Feb 14, 9:00 – 12:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Jack M. Fletcher, PhD, ABPP – University of Houston

Neuropsychologists are commonly called upon to evaluate and treat children with highly prevalent learning disabilities (LDs). But the role of the neuropsychologist is not well-defined and not always aligned with contemporary scientific research. In a recent 2017 exchange in Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Fletcher and Miciak and Schneider and Kaufman (2017) argued over the relative merits of the assessment of cognitive processes associated with LDs, with Schneider and Kaufman concluding that “the existing evidence base that demonstrates the value of comprehensive cognitive assessments for this purpose is not nearly as strong as it needs to be.”

This workshop outlines the views of Fletcher and Miciak, who argued for reduced emphasis on cognitive processes in favor of comprehensive evaluations of academic performance and comorbid conditions in an effort to develop well-defined intervention plans for children with these disorders. The current status of research on LDs will be discussed, integrating cognitive, neurobiological, and educational perspectives. The implications of this research for assessment and intervention will be reviewed with an emphasis on the ethical importance of aligning practice with research.

Effective interventions for LDs will be discussed with the goal of collecting assessment data that will allow the neuropsychologist to prescribe evidence-based interventions as part of a comprehensive evaluation. By knowing the nature of the academic disabilities and associated disorders (e.g., ADHD, anxiety), the neuropsychologist can provide evaluations that target effective intervention based on a thorough understanding of the current evidence-base on LDs.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Deeper understanding of contemporary approaches to neuropsychological assessment and intervention of learning disabilities.
  2. Discuss current scientific research on learning disabilities, including cognitive, neurobiological, and educational perspectives.
  3. Appreciate potential ethical issues that may emerge when clinical practice is not aligned with research.
  4. Prescribe effective interventions for children with LDs and comorbid conditions.

Jack M. Fletcher, PhD, ABPP – University of Houston

Jack M. Fletcher, PhD, ABPP (Clinical Neuropsychology), is the Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Chair, Department of Psychology, University of Houston. For the past 35 years, Dr. Fletcher, a board certified child neuropsychologist, has conducted research on children with learning and attention disorders, and brain injury. Dr. Fletcher directs a Learning Disability Research Center grant and has directed program projects involving neurobiological factors and learning in spina bifida and math disabilities, all funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). He served on the NICHD National Advisory Council, the Rand Reading Study Group, the National Research Council Committee on Scientific Principles in Education Research, and the President’s Commission on Excellence in Special Education. Dr. Fletcher was the recipient of the Samuel T. Orton award from the International Dyslexia Association in 2003, a co-recipient of the Albert J. Harris award from the International Reading Association in 2006, and the Lee J. Wiederholt award from the Council on Learning Disabilities in 2016.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 9:00 – 12:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Michael V. Johnston, MD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Please be aware that Dr. Johnston is no longer able to present. He has arranged for his close colleague, Dr. Mary Blue, to present in his place. You may review Dr. Blue’s bio and qualifications HERE.

Brain plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and strongly influences the outcome from brain injuries in fetuses and neonates. To provide a clinical framework for understanding the influence of plasticity in these injuries, it is convenient to classify plasticity into four major types: 1) adaptive plasticity, which is shaped by exeperiences such as language development and learning to play a musical instrument; 2) impaired plasticity due to diverse types of genetic and environmental influences; 3) excessive or dysfunctional plasticity such as phantom pain after loss of a limb or dystonia due to repetitive movements; 4) plasticity as the “Achilles Heel” in which heightened plasticity during development creates vulnerability to over-stimulation of specific excitatory neurotransmitter circuits in the brain. The expected audience for this symposium will be neuropsychologists interested in brain development, injury and plasticity, and no past experience with brain imaging or neonatal intensive caee is required.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the major types of brain plasticity during development and recognize their role in the outcome of a variety of insults to the fetal or neonatal brain
  2. Recognize the major cognitive and behavioral outcomes of injuries to the fetal or neonatal brain as assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound brain imaging as well as standardized behavioral and neurological testing in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU)
  3. Recognized the major cognitive and behavioral outcomes of injuries to the fetal or neonatal brain as assessed by brain imaging and neuropsychological testing in toddlers who have graduated from the NICU.

Michael V. Johnston, MD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Michael Johnston, MD is a pediatric neurologist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and he does laboratory as well as clinical research on the selective vulnerability of the developing brain to stresses such as hypoxia-ischemia and infection. He is the Blum Moser Chair of Pediatric Neurology at Kennedy Krieger and a Professor of Neurology, Pediatrics and PM&R at Johns Hopkins

Gwendolyn J. Gerner, PsyD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Gwendolyn Gerner, Psy.D. is a neuropsychologist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins and she has a strong interest in correlating patterns of brain injury seen in neonates with neuropsychological and neurobehavioral outcomes. She has described new methods to examine and identify neurobehavioral complications of perinatal brain injuries between ages 9-24 months.

Joanna Burton, MD, PhD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Joanna Burton, MD, PhD is a pediatric neurologist and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialist as well as having a PhD in speech language pathology. She works in the NICU at the Bloomberg Children’s Center at Johns Hopkins as well as at Kennedy Krieger and she seeks to understand the relationship between early biomarkers of perinatal brain injury and neurobehavioral and language assessment tools to detect neurodevelopmental disabilities.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 9:00 – 12:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Stephen E. Nadeau, MD – University of Florida College of Medicine, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center

Irene Minkina, PhD – Temple University

Lisa A. Edmonds, PhD – Teachers College, Columbia University

One of the great challenges of cognitive neuroscience has been accounting for cognition in terms of the activity of 100 billion neurons lipid bilayer encased electrochemical entities that are interconnected on a vast scale by synapses. We now know that representations in the brain are population-encoded, reflecting patterns of activity of millions or billions of neurons. Forty years of research in the field of parallel distributed processing have substantially defined the unique capabilities conferred by networks supporting population encoded representations (e.g., content addressable memory, working memory, representation of frequency and age of acquisition effects, the power of regularities wired into network connectivity, and graceful degradation) and the constraints they impose. Any domain of cognitive function can be understood on this basis but language provides particularly broad and granular insight into how the neurodynamics operate.

This course will begin with an introduction to cerebral foundations of language function viewed through the lens of population encoding. We will then consider the implications for aphasia therapy with a particular focus on mechanisms of generalization: the extension of the benefits of aphasia therapy to untreated exemplars and everyday verbal communication. The last hour of the session will be devoted to two specific therapies for anomia in aphasia, phonomotor and semantic, that intrinsically generalize because they build on regularities in acquired knowledge wired into neural connectivity. The target audience will be participants with intermediate or advanced knowledge of language function.

Stephen E. Nadeau, MD – University of Florida College of Medicine, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center

Dr. Nadeau trained in behavioral neurology with Kenneth Heilman. He is currently Professor of Neurology at the University of Florida College of Medicine and Associate Chief of Staff for Research at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville, Florida. He has devoted most of his research career to understanding the neural basis of language and other cognitive functions with a particular focus on parallel distributed processing, and to neuroplasticity, neurorehabilitation and aphasia therapy. He is the author of The Neural Architecture of Grammar (MIT Press, 2012).

Irene Minkina, PhD – Temple University

Irene Minkina received her PhD in Speech & Hearing Sciences from University of Washington in 2015, under the mentorship of Dr. Diane Kendall. She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at Temple University, under the mentorship of Dr. Nadine Martin. She is interested in the relationship between word retrieval and verbal short?term memory impairments in aphasia.

Lisa A. Edmonds, PhD – Teachers College, Columbia University

Lisa A. Edmonds, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and Program Director in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Aphasia Rehabilitation and Bilingualism Research Lab at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Edmonds conducts research focused on the development and systematic evaluation of novel behavioral treatments (e.g., Verb Network Strengthening Treatment) for monolingual and bilingual aphasia that aim to increase communicative success in sentences and discourse across spoken and written modalities. In addition, her lab is investigating cognitive-linguistic interplay in language processing with eye tracking and cognitive-linguistic function in neurodegenerative disorders such as PSP.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Amy J. Jak, PhD – UC San Diego, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System

Protracted recovery from trauma is notable in Veterans; those with a history of concussion endorse more severe PTSD and neurobehavioral symptoms than those without history of concussion. Polytrauma presentations with comorbid mental health conditions complicate recovery from both physical and psychological disorders, magnify cognitive complaints, and contribute to poor functional outcomes. Cognitive complaints in the post-acute period after concussion are nonspecific symptoms, however, and arise from numerous, often non-neurological, sources. Neuropsychological assessment and intervention, therefore, needs to take into account the multitude of factors perpetuating cognitive symptoms, including misattribution of symptoms, pain, sleep, mental health conditions, history of TBI, and/or other medical conditions. This workshop will delineate the unique challenges of assessment and rehabilitation of Veterans with persistent postconcussive symptoms and will describe treatment options for this population, including novel treatments targeting common comorbidities. The workshop will highlight the importance of reducing emotional distress in Veterans as key to attenuating neurobehavioral symptom reporting and cognitive complaints but will also discuss cases where concussion history may more prominently figure into the assessment and treatment picture. Though the workshop focus will be on the Veteran population, the topics covered will also have applicability to civilians with persistent postconcussive symptoms.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the neuropsychological presentation of treatment-seeking Veterans with history of concussion and persistent cognitive complaints.
  2. Recognize both neurological and non-neurological factors impacting functioning in this population.
  3. Identify treatment options for individuals with cognitive complaints in the post-acute period following concussion.

Amy J. Jak, PhD – UC San Diego, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System

Amy J. Jak, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and a Staff Neuropsychologist and Director of the TBI Cognitive Rehabilitation Clinic at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. Dr. Jak has extensive experience in the neuropsychology of traumatic brain injury in Veterans and active duty personnel, particularly among Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. She is the Co-Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the VISN 22 Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH) and an investigator with the VA/DoD Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC). She is or has been a PI or Co-I on six TBI-related projects funded by VA and DoD and her work has been funded by VA, DoD, NIA, and/or the Alzheimer’s Association since 2007. She recently completed a DoD CDMRP-funded randomized trial investigating a hybrid treatment for Veterans with both PTSD and a history of mild TBI. She has published over 70 peer-reviewed articles. She serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. She is also the Co-Director of the VA/UCSD Psychology Internship Program and has supervised neuropsychology trainees since 2008.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Beatriz Luna, PhD – University of Pittsburgh

Adolescence is a unique period of development when there is an adaptive increase in exploration underlied by sensation seeking that can lead to risk-taking behavior undermining survival. This is also a time of risk for the emergence of psychiatric disorders. Identifying the specific brain processes that are undergoing plastic change through adolescence can inform mechanisms underlying vulnerability to mental illness but also provide opportunities to influence developmental trajectories. The workshop will begin by reviewing the evidence on the specific changes that occur in normative adolescent brain maturation followed by multi-modal neuroimaging evidence identifying functional brain changes supporting cognitive development. Next, we will examine how neurodevelopment can become impaired in psychopathology including future next steps for correcting trajectories.

This workshop aims to build from basic knowledge to an intermediate and advanced understanding of adolescent brain development. Specifically, evidence will be presented describing changes in brain structure, from the molecular to systems levels followed by evidence examining brain connectivity and changes in brain systems that support cognitive maturation. A model will be presented that proposes that foundational aspects of neurocognition, including the prefrontal cortex, are on-line by adolescence. However, the engagement of these neurocognitive systems stabilizes into adulthood as affective (reward and emotion) systems attenuate and processes that support the integration of experience are prioritized. Vulnerabilities for impaired development in psychopathology will build from the understanding of normative development and variability in trajectories that can lead to impaired outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  1. An understanding of the changes that occur in brain physiology specific to the adolescent period.
  2. Gain insight into how cognition is supported by the brain processes available in adolescence.
  3. Have increased awareness of how development can lead to impairment such as mental illness.

Beatriz Luna, PhD – University of Pittsburgh

Beatriz Luna, PhD is the Staunton professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics and Professor of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the founder and Director of the Laboratory for Neurocognitive Development, as well as the founder and president of the Flux Society for Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. Dr. Luna studies brain development, examining the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the adolescent period, from decision-making to vulnerabilities to the emergence of mental illness. Her research uses multimodal neuroimaging methods including: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The findings from her studies have led to an influential model of adolescent development, which indicates that the brain systems supporting executive processes are available by adolescence, but are driven by neural processes supporting motivation. Her model emphasizes that adolescence is a critical period of brain specialization in which adult modes of operation are determined – underlining vulnerabilities for the emergence of psychopathology. Dr. Luna has published over a hundred peer-reviewed articles describing her innovative studies, in addition to theoretical papers discussing her theoretical models of development. She has received numerous awards, notably the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering. Her research has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Mental Health, and has informed US Supreme Court briefs regarding extended sentencing in the juvenile justice system. Her extensive media history also includes a cover story in National Geographic and a PBS Special with Alan Alda – “Brains on Trial”.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 1:00 – 4:00 PM

Credit Hours: 3

Lisa Jacobson, PhD, ABPP-CN – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Andrew Zabel, PhD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Alison Pritchard, PhD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

As a result of technological advances, healthcare systems are now, more than ever before, positioned to utilize the information generated by patient care in the service of improving and personalizing patient care. A Learning Healthcare System (LHS) framework is discussed for making sense of the intersection of clinical care and research and guiding ethical practice of neuropsychology. Under this framework, the commitments and responsibilities of the patient and the healthcare provider/system are delineated, and both practical and ethical implications of thorough integration of research and practice will be considered. To demonstrate this framework, specific strategies and applications of technology to both clinical practice and research will be presented, including “lessons learned” through the presenter’s own DIY experience and development of clinical triage algorithms to improve efficiency and precision of neuropsychological practice. The ethical considerations of implementing such changes in practice will be reviewed, including unique clinician responsibilities and challenges associated with patient information acquired via LHS technologies and screening methodologies. Finally, methods for disseminating quality improvement information gained through analysis of patient care will be discussed, both for clinician guidance within the LHS as well as outside of it (e.g., national organizations, other health care systems).

Learning Objectives:

  1. Become familiar with the concept of a Learning Healthcare System.
  2. Describe applications of technology to clinical and research practice.
  3. Identify ethical challenges and considerations of incorporating technology into practice within a Learning Healthcare System.

Lisa Jacobson, Ph.D., ABPP – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Lisa Jacobson is board-certified in clinical neuropsychology (ABPP) and employed as a pediatric neuropsychologist in the Department of Neuropsychology, Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is an assistant professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Jacobson completed her EdS in School Psychology at the College of William & Mary in Virginia in 1998, and worked as a school psychologist before completing her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA, in 2008. She completed her clinical internship at the Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, in Miami, FL, and her post-doctoral residency in pediatric neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Andrew Zabel, PhD, ABPP – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Andrew Zabel is board-certified in clinical neuropsychology (ABPP) and is a licensed psychologist in Maryland. He serves as the clinical director of the Department of Neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. He is an associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Zabel received his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Drexel University of Philadelphia, PA in 2000, and completed both his internship and two-year post-doctoral training in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Alison Pritchard, PhD – Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Alison Pritchard is a licensed and board-certified clinical psychologist and research scientist in the Department of Neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. After graduating from Kenyon College with a B.A. in Psychology, Dr. Pritchard completed her graduate training in clinical psychology, with an emphasis in child development, at the University of Delaware, earning her Ph.D. in 2006. She worked as a pre-doctoral intern at the Devereux Foundation, a residential treatment program for children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral dysfunction. In 2008, Dr. Pritchard completed her post-doctoral fellowship in clinical child psychology and neurodevelopmental disabilities within the Department of Neuropsychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She then worked in private practice, specializing in psychological assessment, for two years before returning to the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Neuropsychology Department.

Thursday, Feb 15, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

Ruben Gur PhD – University of Pennsylvania

Neuropsychologists have pioneered advances in cognitive neuroscience that capitalize on structural and functional neuroimaging methods, yet their clinical tools and training are still based predominantly on laborious testing procedure validated with outdated “clinical-pathological” correlations methodology. Furthermore, clinical expertise is still couched in categorical diagnostic nomenclature that does not cut at the biological joints. Medicine is undergoing transformation from symptom-based to mechanism-based diagnosis where genomic data are integrated with “biomarkers” to generate individualized detection, prevention and intervention. This approach requires large-scale studies and clinical investigators and practitioners who can integrate their toolkits with multimodal brain behavior parameters. The workshop will describe an approach for deploying fast and effective neurocognitive assessments that are firmly rooted in modern neuroscience and permit precise statements linking behavioral domains to brain systems across diagnostic categories. The workshop will illustrate how a future neuropsychologist can go beyond psychological tests summarized with vague and tentative statements on involvement of brain systems. Neuropsychologists can lead the design and integration of multimodal neuroimaging data and be important parts of the multidisciplinary team crafting mechanism-based diagnoses. We will show how the approach can be applied in multiple settings ranging from neuropsychiatric clinics to educational to military and even space and analog conditions.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Appreciate the transformation of medicine from symptom- to mechanism-based diagnosis.
  2. Understand limitations of current testing tools for “Precision Medicine”.
  3. Learn an approach that has generated appropriate tools and procedures for “Precision Neuropsychology” by integrating behavioral measures with multimodal brain parameters.
  4. Consider implications for training and clinical practice.

Ruben Gur PhD – University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Gur received his B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, in 1970 and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology (Clinical) from Michigan State University in 1971 and 1973, respectively. He did Postdoctoral training with E.R. Hilgard at Stanford University and came to Penn as Assistant Professor in 1974. His research has been in the study of brain and behavior in healthy people and patients with brain disorders, with a special emphasis on exploiting neuroimaging as experimental probes. As Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, Radiology & Neurology, and Director of the Brain Behavior Laboratory and the Center for Neuroimaging in Psychiatry, he has developed tools for “deep phenotyping” of brain and behavioral parameters using computerized acquisition tools that can integrate clinical and neurocognitive measures with neuroimaging and genomic data within the framework of large multicenter studies. His work has documented sex differences, aging effects, and relation of brain parameters to cognitive function and deficits in regional brain function associated with schizophrenia, affective disorders, stroke, epilepsy, movement disorders, dementia and effects of systemic disorders and intervention as well as exposure to extreme conditions such as spaceflight and its analogs. His work has been supported by grants from the NIMH, NIH, NIA, NINDS, NSF, DOD, NASA, private foundations (Spencer, MacArthur, EJLB, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation) and industry (Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Lilly, Merck, MindPrint).

Thursday, Feb 15, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

Stephen M. Rao, PhD, ABPP-CN – Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University

Today, many neuropsychologists view computerized testing as a threat to their clinical practice. The argument centers on the notion that physician referrals for neuropsychological assessments will be replaced by computerized neuropsychological examinations that provide meaningful clinical interpretations. All that a medical practice would require is the purchase of a computer/tablet and appropriate software. No doubt, in some settings, this concern is valid. However, in this workshop I argue that computerized testing has the capability of expanding clinical neuropsychological services to a broader range of patients in a wider range of clinical settings. This argument is based on the premise that an extraordinarily large number of patients who require neuropsychological services are simply not identified by current healthcare practices because, unlike blood pressure or weight, cognition is rarely measured during routine medical visits. With the growing interest in integrated care and a shift to a population health based reimbursement model in the US, there will be an increased need for valid, reliable cognitive screening measures that can be incorporated seamlessly into a standard medical visit with minimal disruption of service delivery flow or need for additional personnel. I will outline our experiences with the development, validation and implementation of self-administered iPad-based neuropsychological screening assessment using two illustrative examples involving primary care and a large hospital-based multiple sclerosis clinic.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explain how integrating self-administered computerized cognitive screening tests into large volume clinical practices can improve health care with little cost to the health care system.
  2. Describe how the integration of computerized screening into clinical practice will create unique opportunities for neuropsychologists in a medical environment with a growing emphasis on population health.

Stephen M. Rao, PhD, ABPP-CN – Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University

Stephen M. Rao, PhD, ABPP-CN is the Ralph and Luci Schey Endowed Chair and Director of the Schey Center for Cognitive Neuroimaging at the Cleveland Clinic and Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. He obtained his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Wayne State University (Detroit) and completed a predoctoral internship at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center (Chicago). Prior to joining the Cleveland Clinic in May of 2007, he was Director of the Functional Imaging Research Center and Professor of Neurology (Neuropsychology) at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee). He has authored over 175 scientific papers/book chapters and edited four books. His current research areas involve the application of advanced neuroimaging techniques (task-activated and resting-state fMRI; diffusion tensor imaging) to understand the disruption of brain circuits mediating memory, attention, motor control, temporal information processing, and conceptual reasoning in normal aging and in individuals in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases, patients with multiple sclerosis, and military personnel with blast-related traumatic brain injury. More recently, his lab has developed and validated self-administered iPad-based apps for testing neuroperformance in multiple sclerosis patients and for mass screening of cognitive dysfunction in older patients attending primary care clinics. He has been a recipient of a National Institutes of Health Research Career Development Award and has received funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Aging, US Department of Defense, CHDI Foundation, Charles A. Dana Foundation, and National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Recently, he became principal investigator of the NIA-funded IMMUNE-AD project designed to understand immunological mechanisms underlying neuroprotection from exercise in cognitively intact older persons at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society published by Cambridge University Press and Associate Editor of American Psychologist and former Editor of Neuropsychology published by the American Psychological Association (APA), and a member of the editorial boards of eight other journals. He currently serves on the APA Publications and Communications Board and has served as President of the International Neuropsychological Society (INS), INS Board of Trustees, and Chair of the scientific program committee for the INS annual scientific meeting, as well as on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology.

Friday, Feb 16, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

John Williamson, PhD – Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, University of Florida, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory

Patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often develop post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This syndrome, defined and diagnosed by psychological and behavioral features, is associated with symptoms such as anxiety and anger with an increase of arousal and vigilance, as well as flashbacks and nightmares. It is unclear to what extent, if any, mild traumatic brain injury may influence the development or the course of PTSD. This course will review heterogeneity of brain imaging findings documented in mild TBI and PTSD, behavioral correlates including autonomic shifts associated with chronic stress, and, over time, associated brain and other physiological changes that contribute to deteriorating health.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Be able to identify commonly impacted white matter structures associated with mild traumatic brain injury.
  2. Develop a deeper understanding of autonomic factors in PTSD and how limbic system dysregulation associated with mild TBI may impact these systems.
  3. Develop a deeper understanding of how chronic stress associated with PTSD may impact the aging process.

John Williamson, PhD – Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, University of Florida, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory

Dr. Williamson is a Research Psychologist with the VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Research Center of Excellence at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Assistant Professor with the University of Florida, Department of Neurology, and is an investigator with the McKnight Brain Institute funded Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory, Clinical Translational Research Program. He has conducted clinical neuroscience research that has incorporated neuroimaging, cognitive and autonomic data in the study of traumatic brain injury, PTSD, and cerebrovascular disease. He is an active line of research funded by the VA examining factors influencing emotional cognitive and physiological differences in patients with mild TBI and PTSD in the context of white matter injury. He is also completing mechanistically related work, funded by the NHLBI to understand effects of changes in cardiac output on cognitive performance and disease progression in heart failure, and by NIA to assess vagal nerve stimulation effects on learning and cognition in mild cognitive impairment.

Friday, Feb 16, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

Ronald Cohen, PhD, ABBP, APCN – John Williamson, Ph.D. – Cognitive Aging and Memory Program McKnight Institute on Aging

Cognitive and brain aging are the focus of this course. Following an introduction to the concepts of successful cognitive and brain aging, we will consider cognitive aging from epidemiological and developmental perspectives. Next will be a review of the biology of aging. Cognitive aging as a manifestation of three possible underlying mechanisms will be considered: Neurodegeneration, cumulative risk and etiological factors, and epigenetics. Age-associated cognitive and brain changes with and without neurodegenerative disease will be discussed. This is followed by a review of the research literature on age-associated cognitive decline in the context of medical risk factors and etiologies, including heart disease, diabetes, other metabolic disorders, and infectious disease (i.e., HIV). Psychosocial factors, including alcohol and drug use will also be considered. The second half of the course will focus on recent findings from studies that have employed neuroimaging and laboratory biomarkers in conjunction with neuropsychological assessment to achieve greater understanding of the structural, functional and metabolic brain changes that occur with advanced age and their influence on cognitive and functional abilities, quality of life, and the daily activities of older adults. The course concludes with a discussion of clinical interventions to optimize cognitive aging with discussion of pharmacological, neuromodulation, cognitive training and behavioral approaches.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Deeper understanding of the manifestations and factors underlying cognitive and brain aging.
  2. Awareness of current interventions that are being investigated to enhance cognitive and functional abilities for successful aging in older adults.
  3. Be familiar with clinical-translational research on cognitive aging, including findings from studies incorporating neuroimaging and laboratory biomarker approaches.

Ronald Cohen, PhD, ABBP, APCN – Cognitive Aging and Memory Program McKnight Institute on Aging

Dr. Cohen is the Evelyn McKnight Chair for Clinical Translational Research at the University of Florida and director of the Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory. He and the center are supported by an endowment form McKnight Brain Research Foundation with a mission to conduct research on age-associated changes in the brain and cognition. Dr. Cohen is the first individual to serve in this role within the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute. The broad mission of the center is to achieve greater understanding of cognitive aging in the absence of neurodegenerative disease and to develop interventions that will help older adults to aging successfully; specifically to maintain optimal cognitive and brain function for as long as possible, and to slow or remediate age-associated cognitive decline. A primary component of the center and Dr. Cohen’s current research is clinical translation; moving findings from the laboratory to clinical application to improve cognitive assessment and interventions for older adults. In this context, his research focuses on age-associated co-morbidities.

Saturday, Feb 17, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

Maria Marquine, PhD – University of California San Diego

Hispanic/Latinos/as, hereafter referred to as Hispanics, are the largest ethnic/racial minority group in the United States. Hispanics are highly heterogeneous, comprising multiple national origins, patterns of immigration, and linguistic and educational backgrounds, and are also known to possess genetic backgrounds shaped by admixture from several source continental populations. As a group, Hispanics are disproportionally impacted by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). They are at increased risk for HIV-infection compared to non-Hispanic Whites and tend to be diagnosed and treated later in the course of the disease. Despite advances in the treatment of HIV, neurocognitive impairment (NCI) continues to be prevalent and impactful among people living with HIV, particularly Hispanics. This workshop will review the science on differences in NCI between HIV-infected Hispanics and non-Hispanics, as well as among subgroups of Hispanics. Current research will also be discussed regarding biomedical and socio-cultural factors underlying these disparities, and the role of genetically-defined ancestry on ethnic group differences in HIV-associated NCI. The workshop will also discuss implications for neuropsychology research among Hispanics more generally, and for clinical practice with Hispanic patients.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify biomedical and socio-cultural factors underlying ethnic disparities in NCI, particularly between HIV-infected Hispanics and non-Hispanics.
  2. Gain a deeper understanding of rates and pattern of NCI among diverse groups of HIV-infected Hispanics.

Maria Marquine, PhD – University of California San Diego

Dr. Maria Marquine is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Diego. A native of Uruguay, she immigrated to the United States to pursue higher education in neuropsychology. She completed her doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology (neuropsychology track) at the University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ). She has post-graduate studies in clinical neuropsychology at Duke University Medical Center (Durham, NC), and on neuropsychology and mental health research at the University of California San Diego. Her research focuses on understanding neurocognitive and other mental health outcomes among Hispanics/Latinos. She is currently the Principal Investigator of several funded studies, including projects investigating neurocognitive impairment among HIV-infected Hispanics (NIMH-funded) and successful aging among Latinos living in the United States (NIA-funded). In her clinical work, much of Dr. Marquine’s practice focuses on the neuropsychological evaluation of Hispanics. Dr. Marquine also serves as Member at Large for the Hispanic Neuropsychological Society.

Saturday, Feb 17, 7:20 – 8:50 AM

Credit Hours: 1.5

Alberto Fernandez, PhD – Catholic University of Córdoba, National University of Córdoba

Jonathan Evans, PhD – University of Glasgow, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

In an increasingly globalized world all neuropsychologists need to consider the effects of language and culture on neuropsychological test performance. This is important if you are a neuropsychologist who assesses patients coming from a different linguistic and cultural background to that for which the tests you typically use were designed; if you work in a country where you have few locally developed tests but need to conduct neuropsychological assessments; or if you are a test developer and want to support others around the world to use your test. The American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology has recognized this issue with the launch of its Relevance 2050 initiative, noting that by 2050 60% of the US population will not be testable on our current tests. In other parts of the world, particularly in low and middle-income countries, there are few neuropsychological tests available and so tests developed elsewhere (typically in the US or Europe) are sometimes used without adequate cultural adaptation and without appropriate normative samples. In this workshop, we will explore the issues of language, culture and neuropsychological assessment. We will discuss how we can address these issues, including practical strategies in relation to use of interpreters in test sessions, the development and use of culture-fair tests and the procedures that should be followed when a test developed in one context is adapted for use in another.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Have a deeper understanding of the impact of culture on neuropsychological test performance.
  2. Be familiar with strategies for assessing patients from different cultural backgrounds including culture-fair options and how to adapt tests developed in one cultural context for use in another.

Alberto Fernandez, PhD – Catholic University of Córdoba, National University of Córdoba

Jonathan Evans, PhD – University of Glasgow, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Jon Evans is Professor of Applied Neuropsychology at the University of Glasgow and honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Jon was the first Clinical Director of the Oliver Zangwill Centre for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation in Ely, Cambridgeshire. In 2000 he was awarded the May Davidson Award by the British Psychological Society in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the development of clinical psychology within 10 years of qualification. He is now Programme Director for the MSc in Clinical Neuropsychology programme at the University of Glasgow. Jon has published more than 170 papers, books and book chapters in the field of cognitive neuropsychology, neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the International Neuropsychological Society and is chair of the International Liaison Committee for the INS. He is an Executive Editor of the journal Neuropsychological Rehabilitation and is a co-author of the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome and the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test.

Wednesday, Feb 14, 4:45 – 5:45 PM

Credit Hours: 1

Michael Kopelman, PhD – King’s College London, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Guy’s and St Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust

Autobiographical memory alludes to personal recollection of past episodes and incidents. In clinical disorders, neurological or psychological, it can be affected in a variety of ways. This presentation will highlight examples, illustrated throughout by clinical case-examples and video-clips (and even the author’s own minor brush with history), and it will review current explanatory theories. Retrograde amnesia (RA) is a fascinating phenomenon, referring to loss of memories for autobiographical episodes and/or personal semantic facts which occurred before the onset of a brain disease or injury. The severity of RA is only loosely associated with the severity of anterograde amnesia, suggesting different underlying mechanisms. There are various theories of how and why RA occurs, and it will be (politely!) suggested that they all have their limitations. Spontaneous confabulation refers to the unprovoked flow of erroneous memories, seen in some neurological patients, now thought to relate to damage in the ventro-medial and orbito-frontal regions of the frontal lobes. A recent study will be presented which tested between alternative theories of confabulation, finding damage to autobiographical memory and executive systems to be most critical to the ‘rise and fall’ of confabulation. Psychogenic amnesia intrigues the media! It can be ‘global’ or ‘situation-specific’. A recently published study of 53 cases has highlighted 4 different types of syndrome (or subgroups), and case-examples will again be given. The study emphasised the psychosocial circumstances in which the amnesia occurs, and demonstrated different patterns of autobiographical memory loss across the subgroups, and with differential patterns of outcome. Commonalities, controversies, and outstanding issues across these ‘anomalies’ of autobiographical memory will be spotlighted. I won’t promise to stick to the conventional wisdom, but I’ll try not to tread on too many toes!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand about theories of retrograde amnesia and their limitations.
  2. Understand about theories of confabulation and their limitations.
  3. Understand about theories of psychogenic amnesia and their limitations.

Michael Kopelman, PhD – King’s College London, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Guy’s and St Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust

Professor Michael Kopelman is Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychiatry at King’s College London (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience), based at St Thomas’s Hospital. He ran a Neuropsychiatry and Memory Disorders Clinic at St Thomas’s until the end of March 2015. His first degree was in Psychology, and subsequently his PhD thesis was on the neuropsychology of memory disorders. He also qualified in medicine and neuropsychiatry, and has practised clinically as a Consultant Neuropsychiatrist while continuing research in neuropsychology throughout his career. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the Royal College of Psychiatrists, and the Academy of Medical Sciences. He was a founder member of, and has been a regular contributor to, the Memory Disorders Research Society. He is current President of the INS, and is past-President of the International Neuropsychiatric Association, the British Neuropsychological Society, and the British Academy of Forensic Sciences. He served on the Board of the INS from 1999 to 2002, and he has been a regular contributor to INS meetings. He has served on 12 editorial boards, including Brain, Neuropsychologia, Cortex, Neuropsychology and JINS, and he has refereed for over 60 scientific journals. His research has encompassed many aspects of memory disorders – including the amnesic syndrome (particularly retrograde amnesia), Alzheimer and semantic dementia, confabulation, psychogenic amnesia, amnesia for offences, and false confessions – as well as calculation disorders, sleep disorders, and neuro-imaging. Professor Kopelman was co-editor with Alan Baddeley and Barbara Wilson of the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Memory Disorders, published in 2002; and he was co-author with others of the 4th edition of Lishman’s Organic Psychiatry, 2009, and co-editor of Forensic Neuropsychology in Practice, 2009. He was honoured to receive a Distinguished Career Award from the INS in 2013.

Thursday, Feb 15, 10:45 – 11:45 AM

Credit Hours: 1

Earl Miller, PhD – Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Working memory, the “blackboard” of consciousness, is at the very center of cognition. By choosing what we hold in mind, we free ourselves from reflective reactions to the environment. For decades, it has been thought that sustained spiking activity was the neural correlate of working memory. It was an attractive idea: If neural spiking underlies thoughts, perceptions, etc. then sustained spiking should hold those things in mind. However, mounting evidence from our lab and others has revealed something more complex. Underlying working memory are brief bursts of spiking activity, not sustained activity per se, and interplay between beta (20-35 Hz) and gamma (45-100 Hz) rhythms, (Lundqvist et al., 2016). This sparse activity and rhythmic interplay may allow the brain to juggle multiple stimuli that are simultaneously held in working memory. Further, the interplay between beta and gamma rhythms may underlie the volitional control of working memory. We found evidence that gamma rhythms, which are linked to the bottom-up stimulus information held in working memory, are regulated by the beta rhythms. By contrast, top-down information, like learned rules, is expressed in beta. When sensory information needs to be cleared out of working memory, beta increases and gamma decreases, and there is a suppression of spiking carrying bottom-up stimulus information. This beta-gamma interplay also occurs as the animals read information out of working memory. In fact, when the animals made errors, the patterns of beta and gamma bursting gave insight into why errors were made. In short, these data suggest a new model of working memory in which interplay between these different rhythms underlies the volitional control that turns on and off the faucet of working memory storage.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain a deeper understanding of working memory, its neural substrates, and the mechanisms that may underlie volitional control

Earl Miller, PhD – Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Earl Miller is the Picower Professor of Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Kent State University in 1985 and his Ph.D. in Psychology and Neuroscience in 1990 from Princeton University. He has academic appointments in The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT.

Thursday, Feb 15, 5:30 – 6:30 PM

Credit Hours: 1

Miguel Nicolelis, MD, PhD – Duke University, Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute for Neuroscience of Natal

In this talk, I will describe how state-of-the-art research on brain-machine interfaces makes it possible for the brains of primates to interact directly and in a bi-directional way with mechanical, computational and virtual devices without any interference of the body muscles or sensory organs. I will review a series of recent experiments using real-time computational models to investigate how ensembles of neurons encode motor information. These experiments have revealed that brain-machine interfaces can be used not only to study fundamental aspects of neural ensemble physiology, but they can also serve as an experimental paradigm aimed at testing the design of novel neuroprosthetic devices. I will also describe evidence indicating that continuous operation of a closed-loop brain machine interface, which utilizes a robotic arm as its main actuator, can induce significant changes in the physiological properties of neural circuits in multiple motor and sensory cortical areas. This research raises the hypothesis that the properties of a robotic arm, or other neurally controlled tools, can be assimilated by brain representations as if they were extensions of the subject’s own body.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to explain the concept of the brain-machine interface and neuroprosthetic devices.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe how brain-machine interfaces have influenced the development of a new generation of neuroprosthetics for treating neurological and psychiatric disorders.
  3. Attendees will learn about a new theory of brain function.
  4. Attendees will learn how a brain-machine interface can control an exoskeleton.

Miguel Nicolelis, MD, PhD – Duke University, Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute for Neuroscience of Natal

Miguel Nicolelis, M.D., Ph.D., is the Duke School of Medicine Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at Duke University, Professor of Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychology and Neuroscience, and founder of Duke’s Center for Neuroengineering. He is Founder and Scientific Director of the Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute for Neuroscience of Natal. Dr. Nicolelis is also founder of the Walk Again Project, an international consortium of scientists and engineers, dedicated to the development of an exoskeleton device to assist severely paralyzed patients in regaining full body mobility.

Friday, Feb 16, 9:00 – 10:00 AM

Credit Hours: 1

Sarah H. Lisanby, MD – Duke University

The advent of neuromodulation tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), accelerated scientific discovery of the functional role of neural circuits in the brain. Because tools like TMS can modulate brain function, not just measure it, their availability has ushered in a new era for intervention development in which knowledge of circuits underlying illness can be used to develop circuit-guided therapies. While much of the work with these tools has focused on applying brain stimulation as a monotherapy, the ability to induce plasticity in targeted regions of the brain represents exciting opportunities for multi-modal strategies that combine neuromodulation with cognitive behavioral interventions. Using focal interventions like TMS, neuromodulation-induced plasticity can be targeted to key brain regions to promote learning during a cognitive behavioral intervention. Using less focal tools like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), the impact on circuit function could be “functionally focalized” by having the individual engaged in a cognitive task during the stimulation. Multi-modal intervention development represents an opportunity for the fields of neuromodulation and neuropsychology to converge in innovative ways that may advance understanding of brain-based disorders and may accelerate discovery of more effective treatments. This presentation will review the latest work coupling simultaneous neuromodulation and cognitive intervention for the enhancement of function, including studies on working memory and treatment of depression.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learners will be able to articulate the state-of-the-art of neuromodulation tools for clinical intervention.
  2. Learners will be able to discuss the scientific rationale for coupling neuromodulation with cognitive behavioral interventions to promote circuit function.

Sarah H. Lisanby, MD – Duke University

Dr. Lisanby is an internationally recognized expert in the field of brain stimulation. Her work is translational, spanning nonhuman primates, healthy humans, and clinical populations. JP Gibbons Endowed Professor with Tenure and former Department Chair of the Duke Department of Psychiatry, she founded and directed the Duke Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology Division that encompasses interdisciplinary research labs spanning technology development, pre-clinical modeling, translational neuroscience, clinical trials, and clinical application. Prior to being recruited to Duke as Department Chair, Dr. Lisanby founded and directed the Columbia Division of Brain Stimulation, where she was Professor of Psychiatry. Dr. Lisanby been PI on a series of NIH and DARPA funded studies on the development of novel neuromodulation technologies, including studies on the rational design of magnetic and electrical seizure therapies. Her team pioneered magnetic seizure therapy (MST) as a novel depression treatment from the stages of animal testing, first in human, and now international clinical trials. An experienced NIH-funded researcher, she has been PI of a series of R01 and U01 mechanisms involving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and other devices. Dr. Lisanby was PI of the series of studies that established the fMRI-guided TMS during working memory training to improve working memory performance in healthy volunteers, and to remediate working memory deficits following sleep deprivation. This paradigm has been extended to mitigate the effects of age-related decline in working memory. In October 2015, she took a leave of absence from Duke to serve as Director of Translational Research at NIMH, where she founded and directs the Neuromodulation Unit in the Experimental Therapeutics Branch in the NIMH Intramural Research Program. The Neuromodulation Unit specializes in the use of noninvasive neuromodulation tools to measure and manipulate neuroplasticity to improve human health. Dr. Lisanby co-leads the NIH BRAIN Initiative Team on large-scale recording and modulation devices.

Friday, Feb 16, 11:45 – 12:45 PM

Credit Hours: 1

Anne-Lise Pitel, PhD – Caen-Normandy University in France

Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) has harmful effects on brain structure and function. The Papez circuit and the frontocerebellar circuits are especially affected, resulting in impairments of episodic memory, working memory and ataxia. The severity of impairments in AUD patients lies along a continuum from mild to moderate, when in the absence of specific neurological complications, to severe, as occurs in Korsakoff syndrome (KS). In AUD without KS, neuropsychological deficits are mainly observed early in abstinence, typically when alcohol treatment is sought, required, or enforced. Yet, cognitive-behavioral approaches, psychoeducation and motivation to change drinking behavior require efficient cognitive abilities. Thus even in absence of KS, all AUD patients may not be cognitively ready or able to benefit from alcohol treatment. Alcohol-related brain dysfunction should be systematically detected to optimize cognitive and brain recovery and to enhance the changes for successful alcohol treatment outcome. In addition, some AUD patients without clinically detectable KS are at risk of developing this severe and persistent neurological complication. They could be identified based on their profile of specific cognitive deficits, brain abnormalities and thiamine level. The neuropsychological and multimodal brain imaging comparison of AUD patients with and without KS is not only clinically relevant, but also provides insight into the brain mechanisms involved in the natural history and evolution of the disease, including impending amnesia.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize alcohol-related brain dysfunction.
  2. Use relevant screening tools to detect alcohol-related neuropsychological impairments.
  3. Identify brain dysfunction observed in AUD patients without neurological complications from those reported in Korsakoff patients.
  4. Choose alcohol treatment options adjusted to the cognitive profile.

Anne-Lise Pitel, PhD – Caen-Normandy University in France

Anne-Lise Pitel is currently an assistant professor at the department of Psychology of Caen-Normandy University in France. In 2007, she obtained a PhD in Neuropsychology in France under the supervision of Prof. Hélène Beaunieux and Prof. Francis Eustache. During her graduate training, she studied the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on cognition and behavior, notably by comparing memory and executive performance of patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) with and without Korsakoff syndrome (KS). She then spent 3 years as a post-doctoral fellow at SRI International and Stanford University in California, where she received training in neuroimaging (structural, functional and perfusion MRI as well as DTI) of AUD from Prof. Edith Sullivan and Prof. Adolf Pfefferbaum. In 2011, she received funding from France to create her own research group focused on neuropsychology and neuroimaging of AUD. She has gained international recognition through her career work, having authored 50 peer-reviewed scientific articles and 8 book chapters among other publications.

Friday, Feb 16, 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Credit Hours: 1

Mieke Verfaellie, PhD – VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston University School of Medicine

Since the seminal reports of HM’s profound memory impairment following surgical resection of the medial temporal lobes (MTL) bilaterally, detailed investigations of patients with amnesia have been invaluable in characterizing the impairment as well as the preservation of aspects of memory following MTL lesions. More recently, such studies have also demonstrated that patients with MTL lesions have cognitive impairments that extend beyond the domain of memory. This presentation will highlight insights gleaned from the study of MTL amnesia about the nature of the processes and representations mediated by the MTL. In addition, it will demonstrate how neuropsychological studies of amnesia have simultaneously sharpened distinctions between discrete aspects of memory and blurred distinctions between episodic memory and other cognitive functions.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize which aspects of memory depend on the MTL.
  2. Describe functional specialization within the MTL memory system.
  3. Appreciate non-mnemonic impairments associated with MTL lesions.

Mieke Verfaellie, PhD – VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston University School of Medicine

Mieke Verfaellie, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Career Scientist at VA Boston Healthcare System and Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. As Director of the Memory Disorders Research Center at VA Boston, she has studied patients with amnesia as a model system for understanding disorders of memory as well as a means of elucidating the cognitive and neural architecture of memory. More recently, she has also studied the cognitive and neural sequelae of traumatic brain injury and its interface with emotional trauma in military veterans. Her work has been funded continuously for over 25 years by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Veterans Affairs. She is currently an Associate Editor for JINS and Cognitive Neuropsychology, and serves on the editorial board of Neuropsychologia, American Psychologist, and Brain and Cognition. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association – Clinical Neuropsychology and of the Association for Psychological Science.

Saturday, Feb 17, 12:15 – 1:15 PM

Credit Hours: 1

Vilayanur Ramachandran, MBBS, PhD, Hon. FRCP, Hon. DSc – University of California San Diego

Our goal is to revive the Golden age of neurology when Broca, Wernicke, Jackson, Goldstein Korsakoff, and others showed that we could draw conclusions about how the mind works by studying patients with focal brain lesions. Although single unit physiology, brain imaging, and other sophisticated tools are promising a revolution, old-fashioned case studies continue to yield new insights into how the brain works. The tradition was continued in the USA by Geschwind and many of his distinguished students including Edith Kaplan, whose ‘Boston Process’ approach, like my own, places less emphasis on detailed quantitative batteries. We begin with xenomelia- the desire to amputate oneself. Phantom limbs and phantom pain; RSD (CRPS), long regarded as intractable can be treated with mirrors. Even physical signs subside in a matter of minutes of visual feedback, which is a striking example of mind-body interactions. The mirror neuron system MNS allowed us to predict that an arm amputee watching the experimenter touch a volunteer hand will feel the touch on his own hand. This may be useful in the clinic as a phantom itch can be cured by watching a volunteer’s body being scratched. Also if intersubjective synesthete (the inborn version) watches the examiner tickle the volunteer then she herself laughs uncontrollably.

We also demonstrate in normal volunteers using convex mirrors that free will can appear delayed and/ or alienation of self can occur. We then switch focus to synesthesia, letters evoking colors, demonstrate its veracity and origin, and cross activation between grapheme and color neurons. Lastly we raise the question of how we use an internal mental calendar to keep track of appointments. 1 to 2 percent of people see the calendar like a circular hoolahoop around them. We used reaction time to demonstrate the effect was real and suggested that it may be mediated by connections from left angular gyrus with the brains GPS in the hippocampus via the inferior longitudinal fascicles. We conclude by describing disturbances in self-awareness. in Capers and xenomelia and point out that both are examples of Geschwind-Kaplan style disconnection syndromes.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To revisit the modular versus holistic view of brain function and emphasize the striking interactions between “specialized” brain modules. For example visual (mirror feedback) affecting pain.
  2. To learn about the astonishing degree of plasticity in the adult human brain which can be exploited therapeutically.
  3. To learn about the extent to which “high-level” cognition is embodied-i.e. anchored in a framework provided by the physical flesh of the body.

Vilayanur Ramachandran, MBBS, PhD, Hon. FRCP, Hon. DSc – University of California San Diego

V.S. Ramachandran is Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition and Distinguished Professor with the Psychology Department and Neurosciences Program at the University of California, San Diego, and Adjunct Professor of Biology at the Salk Institute. Ramachandran initially trained as a physician (MBBS) at Stanley Medical College, Madras, India, and subsequently obtained a Ph.D. from Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. After that, he received an honorary FRCP; London (Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians) and two honorary doctorates (DSc). Ramachandran’s early work was on visual perception but he is best known for his experiments in behavioral neurology, which, despite their apparent simplicity, have strongly influenced the way we think about the brain. He has been called “The Marco Polo of neuroscience” by Richard Dawkins and “The modern Paul Broca” by Eric Kandel.

In 2005 he was awarded the Henry Dale Medal and elected to an honorary life membership by the Royal Institution of London, where he also gave a Friday evening discourse. His other honours and awards include fellowships from All Souls College, Oxford, and from Stanford University (Hilgard Visiting Professor); the Presidential Lecture Award from the American Academy of Neurology, two honorary doctorates, the annual Ramon Y Cajal award from the International Neuropsychiatry Society, and the Ariens-Kappers medal from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. In 2003 he gave the annual BBC Reith lectures and was the first physician/psychologist to give the lectures since they were begun by Bertrand Russel in 1949. He also gave the annual Gifford Lectures in Glasgow, (2012). In 1995 he gave the Decade of the Brain lecture at the 25th annual (Silver Jubilee) meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. Most recently the President of India conferred on him the second highest civilian award and honorific title in India, the Padma Bhushan. And TIME magazine named him on their list of the 100 most influential people in the world.